Glastonbury Spring Avalon Faery Fayre ~ Jasmine Becket Griffith Part two

Archive, Blogger Reviews, Events, Family Adventures, Travel, Witch, Pagan, Druid, Faery, Spiritual

In a previous post I explained that the weekend of 10th + 11th march I spent a glorious 2 days in Glastonbury, seeing my favourite artist Jasmine Becket Griffith, getting things signed and photos too. Along with visiting other stalls at the fayre, and sightseeing around this beautiful and quaint town. Every shop window was amazing, each spoke to me, the crystals, the witch tools, books, everything was incredible.

Have you ever seen such colourful vibrancy and energy in a shop window? I know I hadn’t.

Old buildings, new buildings, unusual buildings, it had it all, and I was thoroughly enjoying every minute of it.

Every side street was a treasure waiting to be discovered. You definitely need to explore and step off the main high street, you’ll discover some amazing sights. Walking through archways, crystal walls, the atmosphere is magickal, and it did my spirits the world of good just being here.

Next time I will show you the campsite and more Faery Fayre. But for now I’ve chewed your ears enough….

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Spring Avalon Faery Fayre ~ Jasmine Becket Griffith part one

Archive, Blogger Reviews, Events, Family Adventures, Witch, Pagan, Druid, Faery, Spiritual

After a whirlwind decision to drive to Glastonbury to go and see my favourite artist Jasmine Becket Griffith

All packed and ready we set off at 6.30am Saturday 10th March 2018. We aimed to get there before 10.30 when the fayre opened, so we could hopefully be rewarded with a limited edition chalice well fairy pin badge. But we had to be in the first 80 people there!! Not really hoping too much, but aimed for it anyways.

After some intense parking, the tightest spots imaginable, we arrived at 10am just enough time to gather ourselves together, quick loo break and go for it. Nerves were HIGH at this point!!

At 10.30 we entered via the disabled access, and I saw her immediately!! As I scanned the room I saw a huge queue!! She’s a popular lady, and honestly though the queue was long, it was lovely to see like minded people, that all appreciate the art of Jasmine. And I must say it’s my 1st ever event like this, and I loved being around such diverse range of people and ages. The outfits were amazing. I would of took photos of people, but I was honestly scared and didn’t want to look rude. I’m also Hella shy so couldn’t ask permission either.

Getting closer, and now nerves have really kicked in, I’m shaking, I feel sick, I’m sweating!! Ahhhhhh

We arrived at Strangeling UK stall first, and here we bought a 3D poster, a Calender, and Alice bag. With these we got the BADGES!! one each as we purchased separately and we even got a FREE FAN thanks to Jasmine’s Husband. It matches my bag!! Now we are next to meet them.

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Here she is signing Hubby’s calendar on his birth month December. This makes it extra special.

Then here is hubby with Jasmine herself.

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I got my colouring book, that I already own signed, and an oracle deck signed too.

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I can’t tell you how amazing this experience was for me. I’m feeling extremely spoilt, and very lucky!! I LOVED this event, I can see me coming again that’s for sure.

Coming up soon is camping, and fayre part two……

Yule Celebrations, Part 2 #Blogmas

Archive, Blogmas 2017

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I can’t believe I’ve done it, in 21 days of #blogmas I’ve missed 1 day. Even though I’ve had 2 birthday celebrations, my husband’s and third daughters 21st. Along with weekend in #London and #Bristol. I’m pretty impressed, as I’m usually skittish and disorganized.

However I am disorganized at home, still haven’t got food for Christmas, or finished wrapping. But that’s a hip pain issue more than anything. So anyways its here, the #Witches #Yule. So here’s part 2.

 

A Yule Log plays an important role in the celebrations of the winter solstice and later became a feature in Christmas even, a large oak log was lovingly brought into the house and kindled in the evening, using a branch from the previous years Yule Log. It was deemed essential that the log, once lit, should burn until it was deliberately extinguished. The length of time, varied from region to region, from 12 hours to several days and it was considered bad luck if the fire burnt itself out. It was never allowed to burn away completely, as some would be needed for the following year.

In England, it was considered unlucky for the Yule log to be bought with actual money, and had to be acquired using other means such as favours, bartering, swapping, anything as long as no money changed hands. Often it was given as a gift by landowners, and sometimes decorated with evergreens. In Cornwall, a kernow tradition is to draw a figure of a man was sometimes chalked on the surface of the log, mock or block. In Provence, where it was called the tréfoire, carols were sung invoking blessings upon the women that they might bear children and upon the crops, herds and flocks that they might also increase.

The ashes from the Yule log were saved to make protective, healing or fertilising charms, or scattered over the fields. In Brittany, the ashes were thrown into wells to purify the water, and in Italy as charms against hailstones.

In some parts of the Scottish Highlands, a variation of the Yule log was observed, here a figure of and old woman, the Cailleach Nollaich, was carved from a withered tree stump. At dusk, the figure was brought into the house and laid upon the burning peat of the house fire. The family would gather round the hearth and watch the figure consumed into ashes, the rest of the evening was spent in games and merriment. The figure, represented, not fertility and life but of the evils of winter and death, the figure had to be totally consumed if misfortune and death were to be averted in the coming year.

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Mistletoe, from the Old English misteltãn, is really a parasitic plant that grows on a variety of trees, particularly the apple tree, it is held in great veneration when found on Oak trees. The winter solstice, called ‘Alban Arthan’ by the Druids, was according to Bardic Tradition, the time when the Chief Druid would cut the sacred mistletoe from the Oak. The mistletoe is cut using a golden sickle on the sixth day of the moon. It is often associated with thunder, and regarded as a protection against fire and lighting. In Scandinavian mythology, Balder the Beautiful was killed from an arrow made of mistletoe and wielded by the blind god Hoder. Shakespeare, in Titus Andronicus II calls it ‘the baleful mistletoe’.

It is interesting to note that mistletoe was excluded from church decorations, probably due to its connection with the Druids and pagan and magickal associations. This ancient ban on mistletoe is still widely observed.

Yule Candle 

This was an ornamental candle of great size, once widely used at Yule throughout Britain, Ireland and Scandinavia.  See how traditions havent changed much, not even the colours, as they were often coloured red, green or blue and decorated with sprigs of holly or some other evergreen. The candle was lit either on Christmas Eve, its light shedding on the festival supper and left to burn throughout the night or early Christmas morning, to burn throughout the day. It was rekindled on each successive night of the twelve day festival, and finally extinguished on the Twelfth Night. Here’s the tradition of the 12days. Its all pagan you know!!

While the candle burns, it is believed to shed a blessing on the household, it was considered a sign of ill omen or misfortune for the candle to go out or blown out. Actually in ALL witchcraft it is bad form to blow out candles. Better to snuff them out. It was also considered unlucky to move it.  In some households only the head of the family could perform this task, it being considered unlucky for anyone else to touch it whilst alight.

So there you have it, not so different to Christmas at all. So eat well, drink plenty and make Merry, for the darkest days are over, the light is reborn. Life will return, we see its first sparks.

Don’t forget to leave an offering outside to the spirits. That’s what we do. And as for Yule log, we use a chocolate one now lol

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Yule Celebrations, what’s it all about? #Blogmas Part 1

Archive, Blogmas 2017

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Yule: Winter Solstice – Dec 21st/22nd

What is the origin of the word Yule? It has been suggested that it has origins from the Old English word, geõla, or the  Old Norse word jõl, a pagan festival celebrated at the winter solstice, or even the Anglo-Saxon word for the festival of the Winter Solstice, ‘Iul’ meaning ‘wheel’. In old almanacs Yule was represented by the symbol of a wheel, conveying the idea of the year turns like a wheel, The Great Wheel of the Zodiac, The Wheel of Life. The spokes of the wheel, are the old festivals of the year, the solstices and equinoxes.

The winter solstice, is  the rebirth of the Sun, is an important turning point, as it marks the shortest day, when the hours of daylight are at their least. It also the start of the increase in the hours of daylight, until the Summer Solstice, when darkness becomes ascendant once more. Finally the light is returning, you can feast, party knowing that the darkest days are over.

Cycle of the Year

Yule is deeply rooted in the cycle of the year, it is the seed time of year, the longest night and the shortest day, where the Goddess once again becomes the Great Mother and gives birth to the new Sun King. The oak king rejoices once again. On this the longest night of the winter, ‘the dark night of our souls’, that there springs the new spark of hope, the Sacred Fire, the Light of the World. New life is set to return.

Fire festivals, celebrating the rebirth of the Sun, held on the Winter’s Solstice can be found throughout the ancient world. The Roman festival of Saturnalia was held on the winter solstice, boughs of evergreen trees and bushes would decorate the house, gifts where exchanged and normal business was suspended. The Persian Mithraists held December 25th as sacred to the birth of their Sun God, Mithras, and celebrated it as a victory of light over darkness. In Sweden, December 13th was sacred to the Goddess Lucina, Shining One, and was a celebration of the return of the light. On Yule itself, around the 21st, bonfires were lit to honour Odin and Thor.

The festival was already closely associated with the birth of older Pagan gods like Oedipus, Theseus, Hercules, Perseus, Jason, Dionysus, Apollo, Mithra, Horus and even Arthur with a cycle of birth, death and resurrection that is also very close to that of Jesus. It can hardly be a coincidence that the Christians, also used this time of year for the birth of Christ, mystically linking him with the Sun.

That Yule is another fire festival, should come as no surprise, however unlike the more public outdoor festival of the summer solstice, Yule lends itself to a more private and domestic celebration. It is definitely more private for us, firstl its too cold and so close to Christmas, so its easier to celebrate at home quietly. Yet like its midsummer counterpart, is strongly associated with fertility and the continuation of life. Here the Goddess is in her dark aspect, as ‘She Who Cuts The Thread’ or ‘Our Lady in Darkness’, calling back the Sun God. Yet, at the same time, she is in the process of giving birth to Son-Lover who will re-fertilise her and the earth, bringing back light and warmth to the world.

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