Summer Solstice 2019

Archive, Witch, Pagan, Druid, Faery, Spiritual

Well its already that time again, the time we all long for all bleak winter. When the gardens are blooming and bursting with life, and summer is in full swing.

But here are some correspondences for the Sabbat, I tend to use all my green adventurine,moss agate and citrine around this Sabbat.

Time to crack open the barbeque, turn on the sprinklers, and enjoy the celebrations of Midsummer! Also it’s nearly time for schools out!! Exams are over, less stress and more thoughts leaning towards enjoying the sun!

Also known as Litha, this summer solstice Sabbat honours the longest day of the year. So take advantage of the extra hours of daylight and spend as much time as you can outdoors, well weather permitting of course.


Depending on your individual beliefs amd spiritual path, there are many different ways you can celebrate Litha, the summer solstice.

However the focus is nearly always on celebrating the power of the sun. So get out there and watch a sunrise, or watch the sun setting. It’s the time of year when the crops are growing heartily and the earth has warmed up.( We hope, here in UK!!)

The dream we have is that we can spend long sunny afternoons enjoying the outdoors, listen to the birds, sunbathe and get back to nature under the long daylight hours.

Traditionally there would be balefires burning for people to leap to drive out evil energies, a tradition still going strong in some European countries, we saw it in Ibiza. Or farmers would drive their cattle through to cleanse them. Nowadays it’s done more symbolically. We’ve leapt a candle in the garden, making our wishes.

I don’t have an altar set up, nor do I do things ceremonially. I prefer to gather my family for get togethers have good food, share stories and enjoy some beers. And hopefully enjoy the sunshine and nature too. It’s very low-key as I’ve learnt over the years, faith and spirituality doesn’t need flare and pomp it just needs you and your intentions.

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Yule Celebrations, what’s it all about? #Blogmas Part 1

Archive, Blogmas 2017

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Yule: Winter Solstice – Dec 21st/22nd

What is the origin of the word Yule? It has been suggested that it has origins from the Old English word, geõla, or the  Old Norse word jõl, a pagan festival celebrated at the winter solstice, or even the Anglo-Saxon word for the festival of the Winter Solstice, ‘Iul’ meaning ‘wheel’. In old almanacs Yule was represented by the symbol of a wheel, conveying the idea of the year turns like a wheel, The Great Wheel of the Zodiac, The Wheel of Life. The spokes of the wheel, are the old festivals of the year, the solstices and equinoxes.

The winter solstice, is  the rebirth of the Sun, is an important turning point, as it marks the shortest day, when the hours of daylight are at their least. It also the start of the increase in the hours of daylight, until the Summer Solstice, when darkness becomes ascendant once more. Finally the light is returning, you can feast, party knowing that the darkest days are over.

Cycle of the Year

Yule is deeply rooted in the cycle of the year, it is the seed time of year, the longest night and the shortest day, where the Goddess once again becomes the Great Mother and gives birth to the new Sun King. The oak king rejoices once again. On this the longest night of the winter, ‘the dark night of our souls’, that there springs the new spark of hope, the Sacred Fire, the Light of the World. New life is set to return.

Fire festivals, celebrating the rebirth of the Sun, held on the Winter’s Solstice can be found throughout the ancient world. The Roman festival of Saturnalia was held on the winter solstice, boughs of evergreen trees and bushes would decorate the house, gifts where exchanged and normal business was suspended. The Persian Mithraists held December 25th as sacred to the birth of their Sun God, Mithras, and celebrated it as a victory of light over darkness. In Sweden, December 13th was sacred to the Goddess Lucina, Shining One, and was a celebration of the return of the light. On Yule itself, around the 21st, bonfires were lit to honour Odin and Thor.

The festival was already closely associated with the birth of older Pagan gods like Oedipus, Theseus, Hercules, Perseus, Jason, Dionysus, Apollo, Mithra, Horus and even Arthur with a cycle of birth, death and resurrection that is also very close to that of Jesus. It can hardly be a coincidence that the Christians, also used this time of year for the birth of Christ, mystically linking him with the Sun.

That Yule is another fire festival, should come as no surprise, however unlike the more public outdoor festival of the summer solstice, Yule lends itself to a more private and domestic celebration. It is definitely more private for us, firstl its too cold and so close to Christmas, so its easier to celebrate at home quietly. Yet like its midsummer counterpart, is strongly associated with fertility and the continuation of life. Here the Goddess is in her dark aspect, as ‘She Who Cuts The Thread’ or ‘Our Lady in Darkness’, calling back the Sun God. Yet, at the same time, she is in the process of giving birth to Son-Lover who will re-fertilise her and the earth, bringing back light and warmth to the world.

BlessedYule12