Week 23 post #HipReplacement

Archive, Arthritis, Health, Hips, Hypermobility, Hip replacement, SURGERY

Such a lot has happened this last week, I feel like my feet have barely touched the ground. And if I’m brutally honest, my body is not entirely up to it all either. All I’m asking for is to be able to do daily living painfree. But nope!!

I’ve been practise walking, and I wear trainers but I’ve somehow given myself an injury of the foot? It’s called metatarsalgia, and it feels like walking on Lego, at the ball of the foot.

I first noticed it in Barmouth while walking, but didn’t give it too much thought, rested it and it settled down. Now it’s reappearing just simply walking to the loo. Clearly it’s not really healed.

So what is Metatarsalgia? Metatarsalgia (met-uh-tahr-SAL-juh) is a condition in which the ball of your foot becomes painful and inflamed. You might develop it if you participate in activities that involve running and jumping. (Which I’ve done NONE of these activities)

There are other causes as well, including foot deformities and shoes that are too tight or too loose. This isn’t the reason why either for me.

Although generally not serious, metatarsalgia can sideline you. Fortunately, at-home treatments, such as ice and rest, often relieve symptoms. This worked well for me, hence me thinking it had gone.
Wearing proper footwear with shock-absorbing insoles or arch supports might prevent or minimize future problems with metatarsalgia. But somehow me wearing trainers isn’t enough?

Symptoms of metatarsalgia can include:

  • Sharp, aching or burning pain in the ball of your foot ā€” the part of the sole just behind your toes. (This was me straight away)
  • Pain that worsens when you stand, run, flex your feet or walk ā€” especially barefoot on a hard surface ā€” and improves when you rest. (Yes definitely me)
  • Sharp or shooting pain,numbness, or tingling in your toes
  • A feeling of having a pebble in your shoe. (I prefer the term Lego!)

Sometimes a single factor can lead to metatarsalgia. More often, several factors are involved, including:

  • Intense training or activity.Distance runners are at risk of metatarsalgia, primarily because the front of the foot absorbs significant force when a person runs. But anyone who participates in a high-impact sport is at risk, especially if your shoes fit poorly or are worn.
  • Certain foot shapes. A high arch can put extra pressure on the metatarsals. So can having a second toe that’s longer than the big toe, which causes more weight than normal to be shifted to the second metatarsal head. (My second toes are Longer than big toes)
  • Foot deformities. Wearing too-small shoes or high heels can cause your foot to be misshapen. A downward-curling toe (hammertoe) and swollen, painful bumps at the base of your big toes (bunions) can cause metatarsalgia.
  • Excess weight. Because most of your body weight transfers to your forefoot when you move, extra pounds mean more pressure on your metatarsals. Losing weight might reduce or eliminate symptoms.
  • Poorly fitting shoes. High heels, which transfer extra weight to the front of your foot, are a common cause of metatarsalgia in women. Shoes with a narrow toe box or athletic shoes that lack support and padding also can contribute to the problem.
  • Stress fractures. Small breaks in the metatarsals or toe bones can be painful and change the way you put weight on your foot.
  • Morton’s neuroma. This noncancerous growth of fibrous tissue around a nerve usually occurs between the third and fourth metatarsal heads. It causes symptoms that are similar to metatarsalgia and can also contribute to metatarsal stress.

But almost anyone can develop metatarsalgia, but you’re at higher risk if you:

  • Participate in high-impact sports that involve running and jumping
  • Wear high heels, shoes that don’t fit properly or shoes with spikes, such as cleats
  • Are overweight or obese
  • Have other foot problems,including hammertoe and calluses on the bottom of your feet
  • Have inflammatory arthritis,such as rheumatoid arthritis or gout

The last risk above is probably my likely cause of this injury, coupled with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome too.

So now I’ve done my eventful days of Birmingham for exams for youngest (she’s PASSED) And visiting my Second eldest daughter in Chester. I’m going to rest, elevate and ice the foot to try and return it to normal, before next week’s physio appointment. If I can’t heal it, then it’s a GP visit for me.

Definitely a dampener on hip replacement recovery, and with walking differently to protect the foot, I’m causing pain in my lower back, and my hip, even the groin!! Which I admit is troublesome, but I’ve been told to expect grumbling groin for a couple of years, so I’m not too worried yet.

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